Archive for October, 2013

23
Oct
13

Fashion: An Exercise In Collectivism

Everywhere you turn, you are being bombarded with ads for the latest “fashion trends” and “latest styles.” These messages attempt to get you to buy new clothes, phones, accessories, etc. so you can feel “hip,” “cool,” “stylin’,” “up-to-date,” “in”…whatever.

The Fashion Media have a vested interest in promoting the latest decrees from the clothing industry, because it’s a symbiotic relationship, for profit; the manufacturers come up with new styles, and rely on the media to promote them. In turn, the media rely on new trends to generate money from selling magazines and advertisements. If they don’t get a lot of traffic (web page views), or sell a lot of mags, they can’t make the big bucks.

All of this is designed to make sure you do not stay satisfied with what you have for very long, so that you will spend money to get more stuff when they tell you it’s time to do so. And just like mindless sheep, you follow right along, because you don’t want the rest of the Herd to look down on you, or ridicule your lack of compliance with the fashion police.

It’s all about peer pressure, because people with low self-esteem either want to be “cool” like everyone else, or they don’t want anyone else to break free and think for themselves–which means the insecure will actually have to re-evaluate their decisions and purchases, and they don’t want to take the risk that they might have been stupid idiots, all this time. The Fashion Police can have none of that, if they are to remain cool!

On a related note, the Dr. Pepper commercials of late have me shaking my head. I hope others see what I see in them: Pepper drinkers claiming to be individuals, all while wearing the same red shirts, drinking the same soda, and all grouped together in a pack. That is just another way advertisers sell collectivism: Disguising it as individuality.

The thing that really chaps my hide the most is the barrage of commercials, around the time school is about to start, targeting kids with fashion peer pressure–and the parents who then scrape and save in order to give their spoiled, insecure children the fashion, brand-name items they feel they need in order to “fit in.” Disgusting!

If you really want to raise healthy, happy children that will go on to be healthy and happy adults, teach your children to be satisfied with who they are and what they have. And don’t say it can’t be done, because I’m living proof that it can–and I’ve been that way (a nonconformist) since I was a young child, and I helped raise a couple of kids to be secure adults.

I see ads for “empowerment” seminars, camps and self-esteem workshops. Seriously?! Why don’t you try telling the Fashion Police to piss off, and learn to be happy with whatever it is that makes you the happiest and most comfortable? Don’t worry about the Herd and what they value this month; we all know it’s going to change soon, anyway. You will have saved a lot of money, in the process!

And how many times have you looked back on pictures of yourself from 20, 10, maybe even just a couple of years ago and said, “Oh my goodness! What was I thinking? That’s hideous! I can’t believe I ever wore that!” If that’s the nature of fashion, and you’re going to look back and be embarrassed anyway, why not be comfortable and do your own thing? And you never know; what you choose to wear might look a lot better in pictures, in a few years, than what the current “trend” says you should have worn during that time.

Let’s all make a point, today, to consciously reject fashion trends and develop our own individual styles. If you happen to like something that just happens to be “trendy” at the moment, fine–but don’t do it just because the fashion industry pressures you to do so.

Let us teach our children to believe in themselves and be happy with who they are. Let us break down the building blocks of collectivism and assert our individuality and freedom of expression. Let’s not be slaves to the corporate machine that tells us we have to set aside perfectly good clothes, and buy new ones, simply because some fashion clown says we should.

If you want to take a serious stab at collectivism, fashion is a good place to start.